Augsburg Impressions

Augsburg (more information in German) is among the German cities with the oldest documented history of continuous settlement. Orginally founded in 15 AD as a Roman army camp, it developed into a provincial capital called Aelia Augusta and later Augusta Vindelic[or]um. The town appears to have remained fully populated throughout the later transition from Roman … Continue reading “Augsburg Impressions”

Altmühl Dinosaurs

The picturesque valley of the river Altmühl, crossing Bavaria from west to east where it joins the Danube, features a number of limestone quarries which continue to reveal large amounts of Jurassic fossils. The Dinosaur Park Altmühltal, located halfway between Munich and Nuremberg near the town of Denkendorf, has a number of them on display … Continue reading “Altmühl Dinosaurs”

Messe München-Riem

Last year I posted a gallery on the peculiar geometrical horrors of Munich’s Messestadt Riem. As noted there the Messestadt got its name from the nearby trade fair (Messe München). While also modern, the grand spacious architecture of the main Messe entrance around its artificial lake (Messesee) is much more impressive than Messestadt’s endless rows … Continue reading “Messe München-Riem”

Schloss Nymphenburg

Schloss Nymphenburg (more details) is a vast Wittelsbach palace and park complex in Munich. Completed in 1675, the palace was originally situated some distance from the city but today is wholly engulfed by it. I always wanted to post a gallery of it, and since I somewhat botched my first gallery with the Sony DSC-HX90 … Continue reading “Schloss Nymphenburg”

Aying: Beer & Architecture

If extinct Prussia was an army that had a state, Aying is the Bavarian equivalent: a brewery that has a village. In ascending order of importance, Aying refers to a spacious municipality to the southeast of Munich, with a total population of 5200 resulting in a density that rivals Antarctica; next, the chief village of … Continue reading “Aying: Beer & Architecture”

Sony DSC-HX90: Pocket Ultrazoom

Having concluded that long telephotos on a full-frame camera are really quite awkward, I decided to check out current offerings in the small-sensor market. Some models can achieve a full-frame equivalent zoom of nearly 1000 mm, as the small sensor effectively crops out the center of an imaginary full-frame shot. Many compact cameras look and … Continue reading “Sony DSC-HX90: Pocket Ultrazoom”

Tierpark Hellabrunn with SEL-70300 and Minadax

Some years ago I got a Minadax 1.7× teleconverter of the front-mounted persuasion. In my first Hellabrunn zoo gallery you can see it in action on my Sony A7R II with the SEL-70200G f/4 lens, achieving a total effective focal length of nearly 340 mm. That’s good but since then I discovered the SEL-24240 lens … Continue reading “Tierpark Hellabrunn with SEL-70300 and Minadax”

Andechs Abbey

The hill overlooking the small Bavarian municipality of Andechs originally held a medieval castle, razed in 1208. By that time, however, several relics had already been transferred to the site, making it a popular pilgrimage location. Consequently Duke Albert III of Bavaria turned the site into a Benedictine monastery in 1455, raised to the status … Continue reading “Andechs Abbey”

Freising Cathedral

Freising is a town of about 50,000 situated around some hills along the Isar to the north of Munich. It resembles the similarly-sized Passau (see pictures of town, cathedral, castle) in several aspects: a long settlement history, including major importance as medieval trade centers, a notable cathedral, and a fortified bishop’s seat. One point where … Continue reading “Freising Cathedral”

Two 19th Century Art Collections

I had recently visited two of Munich’s copious art museums, both showing fine samples of 19th century art: the permanent exhibition of the Neue Pinakothek back in May, and the current (always changing) exhibition of the Kunsthalle right now. The collections are massive, especially at Neue Pinakothek, but I sampled a few items to give … Continue reading “Two 19th Century Art Collections”