Augsburg Impressions

Augsburg (more information in German) is among the German cities with the oldest documented history of continuous settlement. Orginally founded in 15 AD as a Roman army camp, it developed into a provincial capital called Aelia Augusta and later Augusta Vindelic[or]um. The town appears to have remained fully populated throughout the later transition from Roman … Continue reading “Augsburg Impressions”

Some Windows Histories

For some reason, this year everyone decided to publish extensive articles on the history of Microsoft Windows and related technologies. Reading all of them will probably take you a month but they are quite informative, so I wanted to collect them here in case you missed some or all of them. Doing Windows at the … Continue reading “Some Windows Histories”

Schloss Nymphenburg

Schloss Nymphenburg (more details) is a vast Wittelsbach palace and park complex in Munich. Completed in 1675, the palace was originally situated some distance from the city but today is wholly engulfed by it. I always wanted to post a gallery of it, and since I somewhat botched my first gallery with the Sony DSC-HX90 … Continue reading “Schloss Nymphenburg”

Aying: Beer & Architecture

If extinct Prussia was an army that had a state, Aying is the Bavarian equivalent: a brewery that has a village. In ascending order of importance, Aying refers to a spacious municipality to the southeast of Munich, with a total population of 5200 resulting in a density that rivals Antarctica; next, the chief village of … Continue reading “Aying: Beer & Architecture”

Andechs Abbey

The hill overlooking the small Bavarian municipality of Andechs originally held a medieval castle, razed in 1208. By that time, however, several relics had already been transferred to the site, making it a popular pilgrimage location. Consequently Duke Albert III of Bavaria turned the site into a Benedictine monastery in 1455, raised to the status … Continue reading “Andechs Abbey”

Freising Cathedral

Freising is a town of about 50,000 situated around some hills along the Isar to the north of Munich. It resembles the similarly-sized Passau (see pictures of town, cathedral, castle) in several aspects: a long settlement history, including major importance as medieval trade centers, a notable cathedral, and a fortified bishop’s seat. One point where … Continue reading “Freising Cathedral”

Two 19th Century Art Collections

I had recently visited two of Munich’s copious art museums, both showing fine samples of 19th century art: the permanent exhibition of the Neue Pinakothek back in May, and the current (always changing) exhibition of the Kunsthalle right now. The collections are massive, especially at Neue Pinakothek, but I sampled a few items to give … Continue reading “Two 19th Century Art Collections”

Myriarch for Java

Myriarch Combat Simulator is now available in an enhanced Java version, with a JavaFX user interface. I removed the download of the original .NET version as it was fairly rudimentary; I had already planned moving to Java at the time and so didn’t bother properly finishing that version. Overview Myriarch attempts a precise real-time simulation … Continue reading “Myriarch for Java”

Munich Friedensengel

Close to Munich’s Villa Stuck is the famous Friedensengel monument (Angel of Peace), built 1896–99 to celebrate 25 years of peace between France and Germany following the Franco-Prussian war of 1870–71. Equivalent pictures were originally attached to the linked Villa Stuck gallery but I wasn’t happy with them, so here’s another take with the Sony … Continue reading “Munich Friedensengel”